Learning To Count To 5 With a Raspberry Pi

Prototyping a small counting game – pressing a button to count up to 5 with LEDs and on an OLED screen – then celebrating once reached.

My daughter loves to help me build simple circuits, turning LED lights on and off on a breadboard. Not yet grasping her 1-2-3’s or A-B-C’s, I thought building a small game would be an engaging way to get her learning with the things she likes.

To put this together I used the following setup:

Wired as so:

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A Cheaper DIY Status Light

Building that thing I just built, but cheaper.

I recognize that my last post about a DIY Status Light the project had a total cost over $100 (and that wasn’t evening including SD cards, power supply, shipping & taxes). And that high cost wasn’t for core functionality, it was for aesthetics.

I wondered if I over did it, and how much it would cost and what we be involved, to build a status light for as cheap as possible. I quickly found the answer (from the store I frequent):

Raspiberry Pi Zero WH$20.95
4GB SD Card$5.95
Squid RGB LED$3.95
Total$30.85

Building this out, you’ll notice in the images on this post, I’m using a breadboard instead of the Squid. I did this because I had all the parts of the Squid already from separate kits just not assembled. Note everything in the pictures used is the exact same as the Squid, the Squids just pre-assembled and the cheapest way to get exactly what is needed and nothing more.

Because there is no big led matrix panel, I found a normal phone charger or laptop can be used to power the Pi and light instead of a proper >2 amp power supply. This saved about $5-10.

This is a solder-less approach, so there’s some extra cost in getting the Zero WH instead of just the Zero W and the pre-wired RGB LED, if you know how to solder and have the equipment and can shop around for cheaper parts or cheaper shipping, you may further shave a few bucks off.

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DIY Slack Busy Light

My adventure of recreating this DIY Raspberry Pi Busy Light by @eliostruyf for Slack.

A few months back, after listening to Deep Work and trying it out, I was hooked. I found I could accomplish the most difficult and daunting of tasks with absolute understanding and concentration. Though working from a small home with a young family and a couple of pets, needing to communicate at work, and my own personality traits, the absolute best I can do is 90 minute spans. 90 minutes of head down, no notifications, no distractions, no Slack, concentrated work – followed by a bit of a break, then another session. (I realize this is likely more Pomodoro technique than off-to-a-cabin-for-a-week true deep work, however the high level premise is the same, I get into a state of flow).

Setting up less notifications in my life, filtering all input, building timers, blocking out time for sessions, remembering to do it, and sticking to it, was all the easy stuff. Avoiding my family’s interruptions, was impossible. My wife, three year old daughter, and eleven month old son are all living their lives in our small home, feet away from me at any given time. They would randomly pop in, yell, knock, throw things, cry, text, ask, poke, question, hug etc. Breaking the session. Not only demotivating as it scratches the record on my focus that I just mentally committed too, but it would take around ten or more minutes to refocus and realign after they had left, leaving me a bit scrambled and a bit behind. Best illustrated in this comic:

My wife sympathized with me, and we both knew we needed some sort of way to indicate I was in these sessions, or on a call. The classic ‘door open/close’ or ‘headphones on/off’ wouldn’t work in our family, and shooting a text seemed unideal as that may backfire, ignite a conversation or trigger some reminder that may fill the brain with life instead of work. We both agreed that some sort of red light outside the door would be best.

I was thinking just a single LED light. I’d drill a hole in the door jam, and run some wires from a Raspberry Pi or other small computer or bluetooth device to turn the light on or off. This was the plan.

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